Decades of Duty… Tales of UrS4/UrS6 Daily Drivers

February 25, 2013 in Darin's Drivel, Editor's Blogs by editor@s-cars.org

IMG_0175It is hard to believe that my UrS4 is now 20 years old. It certainly doesn’t look it, especially after a good spring detail. It also doesn’t look like it has covered more than 180,000 miles. In fact, it still does quite well in the regional car shows. This isn’t even some California cream puff. My car started life here in America in Michigan before coming into my care in Iowa (and now Minnesota.) All of these states have harsh winters and lots of road salt! My car survives!

I know several other friends here in the Twin Cities area that are still driving their C4 S4 or S6 as a daily driver as well. They somehow remain reliable enough for daily driving even after all these years. Amazing!

With that in mind, I decided that it would be fun to feature some of you who are still living with a UrS4 or UrS6 on a daily basis. I invite you to send me your ownership stories and photos to be featured here on S-CARS.ORG. Hopefully we’ll hear from people all over the world and publish some of their ups and downs of ownership.

Want to share your story? Simply email it to me at editor@s-cars.org and include any photos of you or your car that you’d like to have included.

Getting Your Shine On!

August 20, 2012 in Body by editor@s-cars.org

Spoiler has been buffed.  Contrast?  Oh yeah!

Spoiler has been buffed. Contrast? Oh yeah!

Let’s face it, if you own and drive an original S4 or S6 you’ve got an old car. These cars are special and in many cases they have been maintained to high standards thanks to enthusiastic owners. Unfortunately, that isn’t always the case so some cars end up looking, well, a bit tired.

I’ve known the owner of this black S6 online for quite sometime but only recently had the opportunity to connect with him in person at the Glacier Lakes Quattro Club Spring Ice Out event. The owner (Tom) drives a nicely tuned black UrS6 that at the time of this posting is going on 260,000+ miles! Mechanically the car it doing well but the paint has certainly seen better days. At the Ice Out event I told Tom that we needed to get together and work on buffing his car back to life. That day finally came on Saturday, August 19th, 2012.

I’ll be honest, I wasn’t sure I could save Tom’s finish using the limited buffing pads and compound that I had on hand. Since the oxidation on Tom’s car was pretty severe I would have liked to start with a more aggressive pad and compound but we sort of planned our get together at the last minute so I decided to run with what I had on hand… my Porter Cable buffer, two orange foam pads and 3M Finesse It II polishing compound. This combo isn’t terribly aggressive and is what I normally use on my own UrS4 each spring. I didn’t know if it would be enough to save Tom’s UrS6.

As with any detailing effort start with a very good car wash… and by that I mean do it by hand with soap. We used Turtle Wax T-79 Zip Wax Liquid Car Wash
but you can substitute your favorite here. Once the car is washed dry it VERY well and let it sit until all the water is done running out of the body seams (it helps to blow it out with compressed air too if available).

Next I will generally go over the car with the Mothers California Gold Clay Bar System to remove any remaining surface contaminates. This step helps your finished surface feel extra smooth to the touch.

Now the car is ready for buffing. For this step I’m a big fan of the Porter Cable buffers. In my own garage I use a slightly older version of this Porter Cable 5.5 x 7/8 Inch CCS Foam Pad Kit kit. On most cars I use an orange foam pad in conjunction with 3M Finesse-It II Glaze to achieve a very nice shine without being too aggressive. This is also what we used on Tom’s car even though we could have started out with a more aggressive pad and polish and done multiple stage buffing to achieve best results. Since I had only an orange pad and Finesse It II and one day to get it done we opted for the single pass attempt.

The car buffed back to life with amazing results. Granted, there are still some imperfections in the paint but for a simple single stage buffing the car looks night and day different. Had I done things the long way I think I could have brought the car back to 98% or so but it would literally take me 3 days or so to give it that sort of attention.

To finish things off, we gave the entire car a coat of Turtle Wax F21 Car Polish. I know this may seem somewhat crazy as F21 is an inexpensive non-wax based polish but I have honestly used dozens of products over the years on my own and other people’s cars and when it comes down to a product that gives me a nice even shine, ease of application and removal and a long lasting shield for cars that sit outside a lot this F21 is a great solution. It is virtually the only product I’ve used that doesn’t make me hate life while trying to get a nice deep and even shine on my Tornado Red UrS4. Naturally, feel free to use whatever you like the best.

To finish things off I use a little Mother’s Quick Detail spray (included in the clay bar kit mentioned above) and a white foam finishing pad to quickly go over the entire car for a nice uniform shine.

UrS4 and UrS6 Fuel Tanks on sale this month – June 2012

June 11, 2012 in General Information by editor@s-cars.org

If you own an original Audi S4 or S6 model (1992-1997) you might like to know that Audi here in the U.S. has a special on the fuel tanks remaining in their stock. These normally run a whopping $903 but can be had at big discounts right now. I just ordered one for $173.67 out the door with tax here in MN.

If you live in rust prone areas don’t be surprised if you see your tank start leaking around the seams at some point. Granted, your fuel lines under the car will start leaking first more than likely but your tank won’t be too far behind.

The part number for the tank is 4A0 201 075L

Rear Differential Input Shaft Seal Replacement

May 23, 2012 in Drivetrain by editor@s-cars.org

Fred Munro has written an excellent DIY on replacing the left and right diff output shaft seals.
(http://12v.org/urs/FredMsAudiUrS4RearDifferentialRight&LeftSealDIY.pdf).

Recently, somebody on quattroworld asked about changing the input shaft seal, i.e. item 23 in this
diagram: http://12v.org/urs/RearDiffGearsWithInputShaftPN.jpg

The Bentley shows fewer parts than the above diagram and no Item 19 lock ring. It seems to show pulling the Item 6 cover and the Item 25 flange shaft. It shows the Item 22 round seal (O-ring?) but
does not show the Item 23 radial shaft seal.

Anybody with any BTDT experience on replacing the Item 23 radial shaft seal.

TIA

Dave F.

Is your Air Conditioning Weak on your UrS4 / UrS6?

May 23, 2012 in Climate Control by editor@s-cars.org

If your A/C system is working OK at highway speeds but seems to fizzle out when in traffic or at a stop light it might be your aux fan resistor. When this part fails there is not enough air flowing through the radiator to lower the refrigerant temps. The resistor is located on the drivers side of the radiator (you may need to remove the headlight to get to it). The part number is 4AO 959 493 and ETKA calls it a series resistor for vehicles with heavy-duty water cooling system and/or trailing towing – ETKA list price is $92.00.

Manufacturer Recalls For UrS4/S6 Models

March 8, 2012 in General Information by editor@s-cars.org

A search of the NHTSA Recall Database returns these recalls for the “Audi S4″:

————————————————————————————-
NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 96V017000
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: IGNITION: SWITCH
Manufacturer: VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC

Make: AUDI
Model: S4
Potential Number of Units Affected: 24000
Manufactured From: JAN 1994 To: DEC 1995
Recall Date: 02/01/96
Type of Report: Vehicle
Summary:
DEFECTIVE IGNITION SWITCHES WERE IMPROPERLY MANUFACTURED AND CAN CAUSE SOME ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES TO MALFUNCTION.

SOME ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES, SUCH AS, TURN SIGNALS, WINDSHIELD WIPERS, LAMPS, POWER WIND0WS AND AIR CONDITIONERS CAN MALFUNCTION WHEN THE CAR IS STARTED.

DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE IGNITION SWITCH.

SYSTEM: ELECTRICAL; IGNITION; SWITCH.

VEHICLE DESCRIPTION: PASSENGER VEHICLES.

NOTE: OWNERS WHO TAKE THEIR VEHICLES TO AN AUTHORIZED DEALER o­n AN AGREED UPON SERVICE DATE AND DO NOT RECEIVE THE FREE REMEDY WITHIN A REASONABLE TIME, SHOULD CONTACT AUDI AT 1-800-822-2834. ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION’S AUTO SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-800-424-9393.

——————————————————————————–

NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 97V172000
Component: INTERIOR SYSTEMS: PASSIVE RESTRAINT: AIR BAG IMPACT SENSOR
Manufacturer: VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC

Make: AUDI
Model: S4
Potential Number of Units Affected: 54800
Manufactured From: SEP 1988 To: JUL 1993
Recall Date: 10/10/97
Type of Report: Vehicle
Summary:
Vehicle Description: Passenger vehicles. Some air bag sensors do not comply with Audi’s durability standards over the lifetime of the vehicle.

In the event the sensor should malfunction, the air bag restraint system can inadvertently deploy. Deployment of the air bag restraint system without warning could cause a driver to lose vehicle control.

Dealers will replace the air bag sensor control module. Owner notification began October 13, 1997. Owners who take their vehicles to an authorized dealer o­n an agreed upon service date and do not receive the free remedy within a reasonable time should contact Audi at 1-800-822-2834. Also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Auto Safety Hotline at 1-800-424-9393.

——————————————————————————–

NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 00V068000
Component: FUEL: FUEL LINES: HOSES: NON-METALLIC
Manufacturer: VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC

Make: AUDI
Model: S4
Potential Number of Units Affected: 3000
Manufactured From: SEP 1991 To: AUG 1995
Recall Date: 03/13/00
Type of Report: Vehicle
Summary:
Defect Summary:

VEHICLE DESCRIPTION: PASSENGER VEHICLES. A FUEL FEED LINE CONNECTING THE FUEL FILTER TO THE ENGINE CAN PREMATURELY AGE AND SHRINK THROUGH EXPOSURE TO HIGH UNDER HOOD TEMPERATURE CAUSED BY THE TURBOCHARGER.
Consequence Summary:
THIS CAN RESULT IN FUEL SEEPAGE AT THE CONNECTION.
Corrective Summary:
DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE ENTIRE FUEL FEED LINE FROM THE FUEL FILTER TO THE ENGINE WITH A FUEL LINE OF SHRINKAGE-PROOF MATERIAL.

——————————————————————————–

A search of the NHTSA Recall Database returns these recalls for the “Audi S6″:

NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 96V017000
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: IGNITION: SWITCH
Manufacturer: VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC

Make: AUDI
Model: S6
Potential Number of Units Affected: 24000
Manufactured From: JAN 1994 To: DEC 1995
Recall Date: 02/01/96
Type of Report: Vehicle
Summary:
DEFECTIVE IGNITION SWITCHES WERE IMPROPERLY MANUFACTURED AND CAN CAUSE SOME ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES TO MALFUNCTION.

SOME ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES, SUCH AS, TURN SIGNALS, WINDSHIELD WIPERS, LAMPS, POWER WIND0WS AND AIR CONDITIONERS CAN MALFUNCTION WHEN THE CAR IS STARTED.

DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE IGNITION SWITCH.

SYSTEM: ELECTRICAL; IGNITION; SWITCH.

VEHICLE DESCRIPTION: PASSENGER VEHICLES.

NOTE: OWNERS WHO TAKE THEIR VEHICLES TO AN AUTHORIZED DEALER o­n AN AGREED UPON SERVICE DATE AND DO NOT RECEIVE THE FREE REMEDY WITHIN A REASONABLE TIME, SHOULD CONTACT AUDI AT 1-800-822-2834. ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION’S AUTO SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-800-424-9393.

——————————————————————————–

NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number: 00V068000
Component: FUEL: FUEL LINES: HOSES: NON-METALLIC
Manufacturer: VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC

Make: AUDI
Model: S6
Potential Number of Units Affected: 3000
Manufactured From: SEP 1991 To: AUG 1995
Recall Date: 03/13/00
Type of Report: Vehicle
Summary:
Defect Summary:

VEHICLE DESCRIPTION: PASSENGER VEHICLES. A FUEL FEED LINE CONNECTING THE FUEL FILTER TO THE ENGINE CAN PREMATURELY AGE AND SHRINK THROUGH EXPOSURE TO HIGH UNDER HOOD TEMPERATURE CAUSED BY THE TURBOCHARGER.
Consequence Summary:
THIS CAN RESULT IN FUEL SEEPAGE AT THE CONNECTION.
Corrective Summary:
DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE ENTIRE FUEL FEED LINE FROM THE FUEL FILTER TO THE ENGINE WITH A FUEL LINE OF SHRINKAGE-PROOF MATERIAL.

CD Changer Jamming in UrS4/S6

February 26, 2012 in C4 UrS4/S6 FAQ by editor@s-cars.org

I had a situation where two CDs left the cartridge and decided to impede the changer mechanism. You can probably guess who won (no one, the CD’s were shattered and the unit quit working). The first problem was that after the unit seized I couldn’t even get the cartridge out to discover that there was a disc problem.

I’ve yet to figure out exactly why it quit – unit detected problem and a safety shutdown, the changer drive mechanism overheating, or…..

What I did:
0. First objective – restore basic power to the unit so that I could eject the cartridge.
1. Looked for any unique fuses for the CD assembly – none were found.
2. Reset connector cables to the changer assembly – no effect.
3. Removed the CD Changer assembly from the trunk, removed the cover from the changer, removed the cover and base plate exposing the internal mechanisms, protected by plastic sheets that were semi-transparent.
4. Removed the disc remains.
5. Looked for any loose connections, obvious PCB breaks or components broken by the CD coming apart – none found.
6. Reset two ribbon cable connectors to the base plate, reset the internal power cable connector, etc.
7. Reassembled the unit – no luck.
8. Checked with Audi for the price of a repaired unit – ~ $300, but no units were available.
9. Called about the ads in Quattro Club newsletter – $595 for a whole unit (less head), and none immediately available.
10. Looked for conventional units to replace the changer altogether, looked at Sony since that seems to be who manufactured the unit for Blau. who then seemed to design and add the interface unit, put an Audi sticker on it, and at least double the price. Decided that my only option was a complete replacement – also pricey and time consuming.
11. Repeated steps 3 through 7 again, this time using contact cleaner on the connections and putting a multimeter on the connector plugs to ensure power was getting to the unit (I can send a copy of the wiring diagrams if you’d like them). This time the unit worked after reassembly, and has been working for the better part to three months now (as I shrink waiting for bolts of lightning from the Audi Gods!!!).

Observations:
1. Not even AoA has good diagrams or diagnostics for the 10 disc unit. The best they had available at the dealership was a warning not to use the Alpine diagnostic procedure as it would damage the 10 disc unit. This was on a sheet that said AoA was in the process of creating the 10 disc diagnostics. The date on the sheet was 1992 or 93 as I recall. When pressed in October 1997 the best that AoA could produce was the wiring chart showing chassis connections, but no diagnostic procedures.

2. This appears to be a questionable system. While I don’t strongly object to the music quality of the Audi Bose (it’s one heck of a lot better than the OEM system on my 86 4KCSQ), I’d think that there would be better ways to diagnose and support the customers.

3. Awfully expensive for what you get!

Bill Fuson

CD Changer Info

February 26, 2012 in C4 UrS4/S6 FAQ by editor@s-cars.org

 

 

Who manufactured my CD changer?

If you have the 6 disc changer, it is an Alpine (Audi p/n: 4D0 035 111). If you have the 10 disc changer, it is a Sony/Blaupunkt (Audi p/n: 4A0 035 111).

Where can I get additional cartridges?

The Sony XA-10B Cartridge will work in the 10 disc changer. These cartridges should be readily available.

What is the procedure for entering my radio security code?

1. Turn on the radio.

2. Press the FM1 and the AM buttons at the same time, – hold them down until “1000″ lights up in the display.

3. Use station buttons 1 to 4 to input the radio code. If the code starts with “1″, just use buttons 2, 3, and 4 because the “1″ is already displayed. If the code starts with “0″ then press button 1 once to toggle the “1″ to a “0″.

4. Press button 2 as many times as the second digit of your code. Do the same thing with buttons 3 for the third digit and 4 for the fourth digit.

5. Once the correct code is shown on the display, again press the FM1 and the AM buttons at the same time. Hold them down until the word “SAFE” appears in the frequency display. Release the buttons. Soon afterward a frequency will be displayed and the radio is unlocked.

As you probably figured out, if you do this wrong twice in a row, you will have to turn the radio off and wait about an hour before you can try again.


Sony/Blaupunkt 10 CD Changer

The Audi 10 CD changer was manufactured by Blaupunkt under license from Sony, which would make it a Blau/Sony with Audi markings. I figured that a Sony was going to be easier to find, so that’s what I ended up with. The unit in my car is a Sony CDX-A30, which fits the stock mounting brackets perfectly.

10 Disc CD Changer

10 Disc CD Changer

Sony CDX-A30

Sony CDX-A30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


As far as I know, as long as it has the single 13 pin DIN cable hookup (the blue cable shown in the picture) it should interface properly with the stock radio and transceiver (the transceiver is what makes the changer visible to the radio).

Part numbers:
Transceiver: 4A0 035 239 (Blaupunkt 7 607 765 082)
Bracket: 4A5 035 113 (sedan)
Cover: 4A0 863 716 (sedan)

For what it is worth, a quick search on “Sony CDX-A30″ at deja.com turned up the following information – Caveat emptor, no warranty expressed or implied, etc. ;-)

John Durbin wrote:

In chronological order:
Sony CDX-A20 OK, a little noisy esp. with some head models
Sony CDX-A30 Watch for leaky caps taking out the +/- 5V DC converter
Sony CDX-A2001 30V supply driving the audio stage, nice D/A converter
Sony CDX-A15 Leaky cap problem solved during CDX-A15 production
Sony CDX-A100 suspension, last of the big rotary loaders
Sony CDX-A55 DIN cable is M-M instead of M-F, jams to clear

John Durbin, DEI Audio

Steve Mills


My brake servo failed on my UrS6. How do I replace it?

February 23, 2012 in C4 UrS4/S6 FAQ by editor@s-cars.org

Thanks to member Douglas Fifield, we have a PDF guide posted here. Or click here to download.

1992 – 1997 Audi S4 S6 Ignition Switch Replacement

October 4, 2010 in C4 UrS4/S6 FAQ by editor@s-cars.org

If you own o­ne of these cars long enough there is a good chance that someday you’ll experience a failed ignition switch. When the switch fails it typically sticks in the ‘start’ position which will keep the starter engaged and cause things such as your power windows, radio, and climate control to stop functioning.

If you look in the factory repair manual it will tell you to remove the entire steering wheel and instrument cluster. While that would make access easier it is not essential to do so. For the process detailed below both the steering wheel and instrument cluster were left in the car. The cluster will be repositioned in order to allow for access to the switch however it was not unplugged or removed from the car.

OK, so what will you need for this operation?

  1. Small flat screwdriver (see photo for an idea o­n the size)
  2. Medium Phillips screwdriver
  3. Small towel to cover top of steering wheel switch panel (to avoid scratching it with instrument cluster o­nce moved out of the way)
  4. Telescoping mirror (comes in very handy although not essential)
  5. Light. A small fluorescent work light worked well for my purposes. Just don’t use anything HOT as you don’t want to melt any of the wiring harnesses in the dash.
  6. Thread locker (Loctite etc.)
  7. A few cotton swabs (Q-tips)
  8. New Ignition Switch. Audi Part Number 4A0 905 849B
  9. Patience.. and smaller hands help too. ;-)
  10. A telescoping magnet retrieval tool may come in handy as well… in the event you drop something in the dash. Let’s hope for the best however!
  11. Time: If you are new to this sort of thing allocate about 2 hours start to finish. If all goes in your favor and you’re a handy individual I suspect it could be done in about 45 mins.

Let’s get started… step by step:

  1. Remove the lower instrument cluster bezel trim. There are two Phillips type screws that you will need to remove first. o­ne is up from the ignition itself and the other is o­n the opposite side of the steering wheel. once the screws are out pull the bezel from the far left (USA driver side) out and toward the left. There is a small peg that goes into the passenger side of the dash that helps hold the trim piece in place. That part was simple enough right?
  2. Now we need to get the instrument cluster out of the way. It is held in place by three more phillips type screws located along the bottom of the cluster. These screws go through clips that help hold the cluster in place.
  3. Drop your steering wheel to the lowest position and then cover the top portion of the wheel and stalk with your towel.
  4. Time to pull the instrument cluster out a bit. Grab it at the bottom and pull out… these can be a bit snug so be forewarned! I generally find that pulling and wiggling a bit more from the passenger side helps it slide out. We’re not pulling it all the way out, we’re just going to reposition it so we can get at the switch. (While the cluster is in this state it might be a good time to replace or upgrade your cluster illumination as well.)
  5. Now we need to remove the switch itself. Keep in mind we’re o­nly going to be doing the electrical portion of the switch and not the entire lock cylinder. Make sure your ignition switch is in the OFF position. (Being left handed I found that working from the passenger seat suited me better but your preference may differ.) There is a small relay box looking part to the upper right of the switch… it has a clip that just slides o­n to part of the car. Slide it off and set it to the side for extra room. There are two small flat screws that must be loosened before you can remove the switch assembly. You can spot these screws because they are typically visible as two small red dots. The red dots are the thread locker used at the factory o­nce the switch was installed. You now have the rather tedious task of removing the thread locker in oder to get at the screws. I was able to do this with a little force and repitition with my small flat screwdriver. Just keep at it and use a damp swab to clean the area as you work. Don’t get too crazy here as you don’t want to end up stripping out the screws. Eventually you’ll get to the point where you can’t turn the screws out (counter-clockwise) with a little effort. They are tough to turn at first. Do NOT take them all the way out. See the photo illustration for an idea of how far to go.
  6. You’ve got a screw loose? Well, two of them actually… o­n the ignition switch. Depending upon how much fun you had getting at those little screws you might feel as if you have a screw loose elsewhere as well. Have no fear, the painful part is almost over. Now use your small flat screwdriver to gently pry the switch portion out of the surrounding bracket. I left the connector plug attached at the rear. It takes a bit of effort in a very confined space but it should slide back and out. I went back and down toward the center console of the car. From there I could work it back up and out. (Note: I chose to leave it plugged in during removal and installation as it gave me a bit more to hang o­n to when wrestling for the correct position. If you feel confident that you can unplug it and still be able to get the old switch out and new o­ne back in give it a shot.)
  7. If all went well you’re holding the old switch attached to the harness plug in your hand. Carefully pry the plug off. Get your new switch ready. Your old switch should be in the OFF position so compare it to the new o­ne and make sure it too is in the off position. If it is not, push a small flat screwdriver into the switch to depress the plunger and turn it to the OFF position. Now plug the new switch into the harness plug.
  8. Now you have to get the switch back in place. I came in the same way I went out. Switch end down in towards the center console and then into place sort of from the under side of the switch bracket. The two black plastic tabs o­n each side should be horizontal when sliding in as they are what you tighten the screws down o­nto. Don’t forget to reattach the small relay you removed and set aside… unless you want a mysterious rattle from within your dashboard. ;-)
  9. Got it in? Tighten the small screws o­nce again and put a dab of thread locker o­n the tops. I’d suggest avoiding the hard core thread locker here just in case you have to do this again sometime.
  10. Put the instrument cluster back in place and tighten the three screws at the bottom… make sure you have your clips lined up!
  11. Install the lower cluster trim piece and the two screws from the bottom and you should be done! Start the car. Your power windows and such should now work o­nce again. Hopefully you didn’t drive the car (or not far) with your failed ignition switch or you may find yourself replacing the starter as well.

Good luck!

Darin Nederhoff
Founder, S-CARS.ORG